Bovine Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is a chronic communicable disease caused by a variety of tubercle bacilli (Mycobacterium tuberculosis hominis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis bovis) and has over centuries been responsible for disease and death in all social strata.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Bovine tuberculosis is a chronic bacterial disease of animals caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, primarily by M. Bovis. It is a major zoonotic disease, and cattle are the main source of infection for humans. It also affects other domesticated animals such as sheep, goats, equines, pigs, dogs, and cats, and wildlife species such as wild boars, deer, and antelopes. The name ‘tuberculosis’ comes from the nodules called ‘tubercles’, which form in the lymph nodes and other tissues of affected animals and humans. Although the infection in cattle herds has been controlled in most countries, complete elimination of the disease is complicated by persistent infection of wild animals, such as European badgers in the United Kingdom, white-tailed deer in parts of the United States of America, and brushtail possums in New Zealand. Bovine tuberculosis remains a serious problem for animal and human health in many developing countries.

Learn More